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Found 3 results

  1. Heyo! 1M here! Soo...I made a block of raid and put drives in it, and promptly realized that I could not find raid documentation, nor could I find how to use it. My question is, how do I a.) access the raid. b.) put data onto the raid. Any help will be appreciated, as I am on my first use of this mod, and so far it looks amazing! Thank you in advance! 1M out!
  2. I just finished the first version of bundle - a rc application which virtually merges multiple filesystems into a bigger one. You can use it whenever a RAID full of tier 3 HDD isn't enough for your needs. On the picture above, for example, you can see 10 RAIDs with 30 tier 3 HDDs which yield a virtual HDD that can store over 200MB of data. You can also use filesystems of different size and create files bigger than any of the used filesystems since bundle is capable of storing a file on multiple HDDs. If you encounter any bug, please report it on my github repository. Also check out the wiki page. How to use it First of all you can download it from pastebin (id: TmeSNidd) or my github repository and install the file in the directory for rc script (/etc/rc.d/bundle.lua). Before using it you should configure the constants at the top of the script in accordance with their descriptions. Otherwise Bundle might work incorrectly. Then you need to add some filesystems by executing rc bundle add [address] in the shell. Please replace [address] by the address of the desired filesystem. Doing so wipes the added filesystem. However, Bundle never incorporates filesystems automatically. Next you should allow bundle to run in background by executing rc bundle enable Just reboot the computer and it should be listed by df Note that the label of the first added filesystem and the filesystem provided by Bundle are always equal since that's the way how bundle stores it. You can also view the added filesystems by executing rc bundle list You can also remove added filesystems by rc bundle remove [forcefully] Currently, this just removes the last added filesystem, however. If the removal causes the lose of data this fails except you set [forcefully]. Usage notes Don't install the OS on a Bundle filesystem since Bundle requires some functions of OpenOS. Bundle uses a virtual copy of the file structure. On the one hand this makes "hardware" operations faster, on the other hand it might lead to errors when running out of memory. Bundle works with Lua 5.2 as well as Lua 5.3. Known bugs Seek operations that set the current position to a value that is bigger than the size of the file cause the file the become bigger than its actual physical size. This is also the case on filesystem components of Open Computers but with bundle it might cause internal errors. That is it for now, have fun using Bundle.
  3. DistFS I needed a larger storage capability in one computer to store long-term data captured on a multiplayer server. Since I didn't want to just cheat and make it "outside" of the world, I decided that what I needed was an infinitely-expandable (although admittedly not scalable) storage medium. RAIDs seemed like a perfect approach, but I didn't want to deal with trying to manage a ton of files. My solution was to build a spanned file system that could manage my files for me across multiple RAIDs, synchronize folder structures, and induct new arrays into the spanned volume automatically. The result is DistFS. It comes with a simple installation wizard that can install and configure DistFS for you, and it set up to be easily deployed via a disk. Just pop it in, let the wizard show up, and you're off to the races. DistFS has the following features: Automatically manage RAID drive folder structures Won't induct non-raid file systems into distfs (configurable) Fully compatible with all standard command-line utilities (edit, df, cat, etc.) Makes it all available on a single mount point, /distfs Automatically starts at boot Simple installation / configuration wizard Ease of reconfiguration - just re-insert the install disk Multi-master arrays are supported. Just set a single computer as the array master, and configure the other computers not to be DistFS Upcoming features: Gracefully handling removal of RAID volumes unexpectedly Finer control over which file systems are spanned Management utilities A manual DistFS does not, and will not: Support multiple spanned volumes on one computer Play nice with removable disk drives (floppies, tapes, etc) Support unmanaged drives Allow files to span volumes - all individual files must fit within a single drive in the spanned volume (i.e. no 13MByte files) Feed your ocelot Currently, I don't have a simple "pastebin run xxxx" command for DistFS - I'll try to get one up shortly. To view and download all DistFS files and/or suggest changes, visit the Github repository at https://github.com/sukasa/distfs . I recommend downloading all of the files to a floppy disk; this provides the best user experience when setting up DistFS DistFS has not been tested on a Lua 5.2 Architecture. It may work, but was developed on 5.3
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